Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

 

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) are fundamental values of the association and its members, and EDI is listed as a strategic direction of the American Library Association. Equity, diversity, and inclusion work is never finished, and it is important that library workers continue to discover new strategies that will lead to more equitable library services. During LibLearnX, we have created space to foster learning and growth in various equity, diversity, and inclusion topics.

To learn more about EDI efforts at ALA, we invite members to visit ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services which offers diverse book awards, professional development opportunities, scholarships, and more.

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See a sample of EDI education sessions below, with more to be added soon.

ShopTalks

Pick up practical knowledge and tips and learn about hot topics and trends at “bite-sized” Shop Talk presentations that focus on a specific idea, project, or workflow. Sessions will be approximately 2025 minutes in length.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) programming should be seen as ideas that promote acceptance and solutions that are put in place for change. DEI programming can complement and reinforce the organization's mission, vision, and values. Programming should have an impact to deliver meaningful information and should align with the organization’s needs. Our library’s Diversity and Inclusion committee recognized the need for such programming and has developed several ways and methods to deliver DEI content. This presentation will discuss our programs, how/where we deliver the content, the impact that these programs have made, and strategies to avoid ineffective programming.

The American Indian Library Association sponsored a new member initiative to encourage people to read materials from Indigenous authors. How did this inaugural program do, and how can you replicate something similar? What's next for Read Native?

Have you ever wondered why your library doesn't have an internship program? Have you thought about changing that? Does the lack of diversity in librarianship bother you? As a previous graduate library intern and now a Resident Information Literacy Librarian at the University of Northern Colorado, Ramón shares insights from his experience as well as that of other interns into why library internships matter, their impact on BIPOC library students, and how internships can help libraries work on their Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion goals.

Makerspaces and making activities are more common than ever in public libraries, but very few are designed to be accessible by all. Conversations with public library patrons with disabilities have illuminated the need for more inclusive services, equipment, and practices. This session, developed as a result of an IMLS funded grant (LG-246292-OLS-20), will examine the results of those conversations. Attendees will gain knowledge of the importance of inclusive design, and will leave with practical tips for improving accessibility in their own makerspaces and making activities.

Ideas Xchange

Discover innovative ideas about the topics that matter most to the library community. Creative projects will be shared in peer-to-peer conversations through photo images, videos, or engaging conversations in a social and informal learning space in the LLX Marketplace. Sessions will be approximately 30 minutes in length.

The American Library Association adopted the 9th principle to the Code of Ethics at the end of ALA Annual 2021. To support the professional framework of equity, diversity, and inclusion which is a ALA Strategic Direction, this session provides a deeper understanding and interpretation of the newly adopted principle through presentation and Q&A.

Seeking to eradicate the deficit narrative of the ‘Preschool to prison pipeline,’ this learning and idea exchange will share research, practice, programming, and leadership perspectives of facilitating single-gendered literacy models for Black boys and young Black men for libraries. This session will identify the gaps in services, policies, and leadership within the library profession to encourage asset-based approaches to operationalize outreach from storytime to teen programs, creating nurturing literacy spaces for young Black males. Insight about the Black male identity, the ‘library as place,’ leadership development, and culturally responsive programming is included and a timely, necessary discussion for libraries.

Learning Labs

Delve into current issues and topics of interest with action-based instruction and collaborative learning at Learning Lab sessions. With a focus on specific methods, approaches, and opportunities, you’ll leave with immediately actionable insights to take back to your library. Sessions will be approximately 1 hour, 15 minutes in length.

The program considers the ongoing efforts of the Intellectual Freedom and Social Justice Working Group. The ALA Council at Midwinter Conference 2021 approved The Resolution to Condemn White Supremacy and Fascism as Antithetical to Library Work and charged the Working Group with reviewing neutrality rhetoric and identifying possible alternatives. The ALA Executive Board subsequently added a charge to the Working Group to host dialogues on neutrality as part of its activities. This program will engage the audience in facilitated small-group dialogues about the role of neutrality in libraries and explore options for centering social justice as a guiding principle.

While there’s an increased demand for materials authored by historically underrepresented groups, there is also no easy way to identify this content due to a lack of authoritative and standardized metadata relating to author identity. Following an overview conversation addressing the ethical, practical, and legal ramifications for stakeholders throughout the book supply chain, we will have an extended Q&A session featuring – an academic librarian, an aggregator and a publisher – to address the audience’s questions and various points of view around this timely and relevant topic.

We will build a new framework to bring the mental and physical health benefits of nature-based programming to underserved urban areas to achieve goals including community-building and support, equity, environmental justice, and innovation through new app development. We will help to build community, working through traditional barriers to nature faced by marginalized communities and individuals, including safety, education, accessibility, and transportation.

We will learn how to bring programs such as stargazing, nature walks, outdoor exercise programs, community gardening and cooking classes, kayaking, birdwatching, foraging, and utilizing field guides to libraries which have been underserved in these areas.

Accelerators

Led by an expert facilitator, Accelerator sessions will expose you to out-of-the-box ideas that challenge traditional thinking and concepts and empower you to accelerate your ideas. Sessions will be approximately 2 hours in length.

Sessions will be added soon.

 

 

More than 120 carefully curated educational sessions will be available in a wide variety of subject matter topics, including Books and Authors, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion, Career Development & Leadership, Collection Development, Community Outreach & Partnerships, Data Collection, Digital Equity, Human Resources, Library Services, Mental Health, Reader’s Advisory, and Technology Innovation. Check out a preview of LibLearnX education sessions.

Networking and Celebrations

MLK Sunrise Celebration

The 23rd annual MLK Sunrise Celebration commemorates Dr. King's legacy and recognizes the connection between his life's work and the library world. The event will feature passages from the works of Dr. King, a keynote address, and a call-to-action. The 2022 Celebration is sponsored by ALA's Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services and ALA’s Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT).

LibLearnX is a must-attend learning experience exclusively for ALA Members.

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